The Flintridge Press

Filed under Wellness

Managing Back-to-School Stress

Photo courtesy Kailyn Chiu

Photo courtesy Kailyn Chiu

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Although returning back to school can be exciting, it is also common to feel stressed about the upcoming school year. The combination of school work, extracurricular activities, and the many other things that Prep students juggle can be overwhelming. Fortunately, by setting a consistent sleep schedule, getting involved, and taking care of oneself, students can develop healthy habits and start off the school year on the right foot.

Setting a regular sleep schedule is critical to one’s health and well-being because sleep is an essential time for the body to grow, fight sicknesses, and maintain healthy hormone levels. Sleep also improves academic performance through boosting processes like memory and information organization. A study conducted by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine shows that “hours of sleep per school night were significantly positively associated with GPA and level of motivation.” To get a healthy amount of sleep, it is helpful to create a bedtime routine, avoid caffeine, vigorous exercise, and meals right before sleeping, and wake up and go to bed at around the same time each day.

Another way to destress is to get involved in extracurricular activities like sports and clubs. Joining these activities is a great way to pursue your own hobbies and meet people with common interests. Like sleep, extracurriculars are also proven to increase initiative and academic outcomes. According to Harvard Educational Review, “[Extracurricular activities] foster school identification/commitment that benefits diverse academic outcomes, particularly for socioeconomically disadvantaged students.” The school pride caused by involvement in extracurriculars makes school a more meaningful environment for students. It is also important to note, however, that being involved in too many extracurricular activities can cause even more stress. Because of this, try to prioritize the activities that you like the most and cut out ones that are not as important.

The final crucial way to curb back-to-school stress is setting time aside to take care of yourself. One way to do this is by practicing mindfulness and meditation to help with focus and overall well-being. The Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine says, “mindfulness meditation decreases anxiety and detrimental self-focus of attention, which, in turn, promotes social skills and academic outcomes.” If meditation is not for you, there are still many other ways to take care of oneself. Whether it be spending time with friends, playing with your dog, or journaling, finding a way to relax yourself will benefit you in the long run.

Overall, getting a healthy amount of sleep, joining extracurricular activities, and finding your own relaxation methods will help to reduce the stress of coming back to school. Research demonstrates that these activities improve academic performance in addition to one’s health and happiness. Hopefully, using these methods can help you to thrive not only in the back-to-school season, but also in years to come.

About the Contributors
Maya Le, A&E Editor

Grade:  10

Years on Staff:  2

What do you like to do in your free time?  In my free time I like to dance, read, watch movies, and spend time with family and friends.

Why are you writing for The Flintridge Press?  I am writing for the newspaper to help keep both myself and the Prep community informed of what is going on at Prep and in the world. As a contributor to the wellness beat, I hope to emphasize the importance of all Prep students’ health and happiness.

What other activities do you participate in at Prep?  At Prep, I’m a part of the girls’ tennis team, Hip Hop and Contemporary Club, Amnesty International, and the yearbook.

Favorite Quote:  “My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” – Maya Angelou

Kailyn Chiu, Graphic Designer

Grade:  12

Years on Staff:  1

What do you like to do in your free time?  Hanging out with friends, shopping, art, learning new songs on the piano, finding new cafés, cooking, Netflix.

Why are you doing graphic design for The Flintridge PressI love art, and I want to pursue media marketing and advertising, so I wanted to explore different mediums of art (i.e. graphic design) and gain more experience.

What other activities do you participate in at Prep? I’m co-head of Prep Store, communications chair of French Honors Society, a member of the golf team, and a senior leader.

Favorite Quote:  “You will always be too much of something for someone: too big, too loud, too soft, too edgy. If you round out your edges, you lose your edge. Apologize for mistakes. Apologize for unintentionally hurting someone — profusely. But don’t apologize for being who you are.” -Danielle Laporte

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Managing Back-to-School Stress

    Wellness

    Overcoming Fear

  • Managing Back-to-School Stress

    Wellness

    How to Be a Smart Eater

  • Managing Back-to-School Stress

    People of Prep

    Ms. Hare on Student and Individual Wellness

  • Managing Back-to-School Stress

    Prep News

    Homecoming in the Midnight Garden

  • Managing Back-to-School Stress

    Opinion

    The Lie of the Migrant Caravan

  • Managing Back-to-School Stress

    Prep News

    Prep Students Celebrate Annual Spirit Week and Powderpuff Game

  • Managing Back-to-School Stress

    World News

    2018 Nobel Peace Prize Recognizes Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad

  • Managing Back-to-School Stress

    Opinion

    Classifying and Defending Prep’s Strangest Art

  • Managing Back-to-School Stress

    Professional Sports

    Red Sox Beat Dodgers 5-1 to Win World Series

  • Managing Back-to-School Stress

    Football

    Football Loses Homecoming Game, but Reaches Playoffs

The Student-Run News Site of Flintridge Preparatory School
Managing Back-to-School Stress